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Recital 10 introduced the REQUIRE() and REQUIRE_ONCE() statement.

The REQUIRE() statement includes and executes the contents of the specified file at the current program execution level.

When a file is included, the code it contains inherits the variable scope of the line on which the include occurs. Any variables, procedures, functions or classes declared in the included file will be available at the current program execution level.

The REQUIRE_ONCE() statement is identical to the REQUIRE() statement except that Recital will check to see if the file as already been included and if so ignore the command.

The full syntax is:
REQUIRE( expC )
REQUIRE_ONCE( expC )

e.g.

REQUIRE_ONCE( "myapp/myglobals.prg" )
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When stress testing our loadbalancer, i was unable to get more than 20 reliable ssh connections. The following error would be reported.

ssh_exchange_identification: Connection closed by remote host

The resolution for this is quite simple.

Edit the /etc/ssh/sshd_config file and increase the MaxStartups. On my server i set this to 200.

Edit /etc/sysctrl.conf and add the following line:

net.core.netdev_max_backlog = 3000

Then apply this change:

# sysctl -p

 

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Recital's version of Samba allows application data to be shared and locked correctly across these systems, allowing a truly integrated heterogeneous data environment. For example Recital applications running on a UNIX/Linux server can read and update FoxPro databases residing on a Microsoft Windows NT server through the use of Samba.
You can view the modified changes by downloading the following files and patching these into your current Samba installation.
open.c (file opening and share modes)
version.h (versioning information)
The variable CPPFLAGS in the file Makefile will require the define -DRECITAL added to it.
In order to make the locking compatible between UNIX/Linux and Windows the following environment variable must be placed in the profile.db for Unix/Linux Developer and in profile.uas for the Universal Application Server:
DB_SAMBA=YES ;export DB_SAMBA 
The following settings need to be added to the smb.conf file to ensure that file names are always converted to lower case:
preserve case = no 
default case = lower 
mangle case = yes 
The following settings need to be added to the smb.conf file for locking to operate correctly:
oplocks = False
share modes = no
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Mac OS X leopard supports Universal Binaries so executables and dynamic libraries can be run on multiple architectures. A good example of this is the default apache install on Mac OS X. 
In order to compile apache modules for this architecture you must use the following flags when configuring the apache install.
 ./configure CFLAGS='-arch x86_64' APXSLDFLAGS='-arch x86_64' --with-apxs=/usr/sbin/apxs
Then you must pass the these additional flags to the apxs command in order to generate a Universal Binary shared module.
-Wl,-dynamic -Wl,'-arch ppc' -Wl,'-arch ppc64' -Wl,'-arch i386' -Wl,'-arch x86_64' 
-Wc,-dynamic -Wc,'-arch ppc' -Wc,'-arch ppc64' -Wc,'-arch i386' -Wc,'-arch x86_64' 
If you then do a file command on the shared module it should return; 
$ file mod_recital.so 
mod_recital2.2.so: Mach-O universal binary with 4 architectures 
mod_recital2.2.so (for architecture ppc7400): Mach-O bundle ppc 
mod_recital2.2.so (for architecture ppc64): Mach-O 64-bit bundle ppc64 
mod_recital2.2.so (for architecture i386): Mach-O bundle i386 
mod_recital2.2.so (for architecture x86_64): Mach-O 64-bit bundle x86_64
The apache module files are stored in the /usr/libexec/apache2/ directory on a default apache install on the Mac and the configuration file is /private/etc/apache2/httpd.conf
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Recital Web: cookies, sessions, 64-bit Apache module: documentation update:

Recital Web Getting Started
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TIP
The Recital Oracle Gateway requires the Oracle libclntsh.so shared library.  If this file is unknown to ld.so.conf, add it using the ldconfig command. 
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This link provides a decent covering of this topic.
http://www.the-art-of-web.com/css/border-radius/
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DRBD:
DRBD (Distributed Replicated Block Device) forms the storage redundancy portition of a HA cluster setup. Explained in basic terms DRBD provides a means of achieving RAID 1 behavoir over a network, where whole block devices are mirrored accross the network.

To start off you will need 2 indentically sized raw drives or partitions. Many how-to's on the internet assume the use of whole drives, of course this will be better performance, but if you are simply getting familar with the technology you can repartition existing drives to allow for two eqaully sized raw partitions, one on each of the systems you will be using.

There are 3 DRBD replication modes:
• Protocol A: Write I/O is reported as completed as soon as it reached local disk and local TCP send buffer
• Protocol B: Write I/O is reported as completed as soon as it reached local disk and remote TCP buffer cache
• Protocol C: Write I/O is reported as completed as soon as it reached both local and remote disks.

If we were installing the HA cluster on a slow LAN or if the geogrphical seperation of the systems involved was great, then I recommend you opt for asyncronous mirroring (Protocol A) where the notifcation of a completed write operation occurs as soon as the local disk write is performed. This will greatly improve performance.

As we are setting up our HA cluster connected via a fast LAN, we will be using DRBD in fully syncronous mode, protocol C.
Protocol C involves the file system on the active node only being notified that the write operation was finished when the block is written to both disks of the cluster. Protocol C is the most commonly used mode of DRBD.

/etc/drbd.conf

global { usage-count yes; }
common { syncer { rate 10M; } }
resource r0 {
protocol C;
net {
max-buffers 2048;
ko-count 4;
}
on bailey {
device    /dev/drbd0;
disk      /dev/sda4;
address   192.168.1.125:7789;
meta-disk internal;
}
on giskard {
device    /dev/drbd0;
disk      /dev/sda3;
address   192.168.1.127:7789;
meta-disk internal;
}
}

drbd.conf explained:

Global section, usage-count. The DRBD project keeps statistics about the usage of DRBD versions. They do this by contacting a HTTP server each time a new DRBD version is installed on a system. This can be disabled by setting usage-count no;.

The common seciton contains configurations inhereted by all resources defined.
Setting the syncronisation rate, this is accoimplished by going to the syncer section and then assigning a value to the rate setting. The syncronisation rate refers to rate in which the data is being mirrored in the background. The best setting for the syncronsation rate is related to the speed of the network with which the DRBD systems are communicating on. 100Mbps ethernet supports around 12MBps, Giggabit ethernet somewhere around 125MBps.

in the configuration above, we have a resource defined as r0, the nodes are configured in the "on" host subsections.
"Device" configures the path of the logical block device that will be created by DRBD
"Disk" configures the block device that will be used to store the data.
"Address" configures the IP address and port number of the host that will hold this DRBD device.
"Meta-disk" configures the location where the metadata about the DRBD device will be stored.
You can set this to internal and DRBD will use the physical block device to store the information, by recording the metadata within the last sections of the disk.
Once you have created your configuration file, you must conduct the following steps on both the nodes.

Create device metadata.

$ drbdadm create-md r0
v08 Magic number not found
Writing meta data...
initialising activity log
NOT initialized bitmap
New drbd meta data block sucessfully created.
success

Attach the backing device.
$ drbdadm attach r0

Set the syncronisation parameters.
$ drbdadm syncer r0

Connect it to the peer.
$ drbdadm connect r0

Run the service.
$ service drbd start

Heartbeat:

Heartbeat provides the IP redundancy and the service HA functionailty.
On the failure of the primary node the VIP is assigned to the secondary node and the services configured to be HA are started on the secondary node.

Heartbeat configuration:

/etc/ha/ha.conf

## /etc/ha.d/ha.cf on node1
## This configuration is to be the same on both machines
## This example is made for version 2, comment out crm if using version 1
// replace the node variables with the names of your nodes.

crm no
keepalive 1
deadtime 5
warntime 3
initdead 20
bcast eth0
auto_failback yes
node bailey
node giskard

/etc/ha.d/authkeys
// The configuration below set authentication off, and encryption off for the authentication of nodes and their packets.
//Note make sure the authkeys file has the correct permisisions chmod 600

## /etc/ha.d/authkeys
auth 1
1 crc

/etc/ha.d/haresources
//192.168.1.40 is the VIP (Virtual IP) assigned to the cluster.
//the "smb" in the configuration line represents the service we wish to make HA
// /devdrbd0 represents the resource name you configured in the drbd.conf

## /etc/ha.d/haresources
## This configuration is to be the same on both nodes

bailey 192.168.1.40 drbddisk Filesystem::/dev/drbd0::/drbdData::ext3 smb

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When using Eclipse CDT on Fedora 7 I was unable to build anything from inside Eclipse Ganymede.

As it turns out, you need to do this:

cp /usr/bin/ld /usr/libexec/gcc/i386-redhat-linux/4.1.2/real-ld

This is because gcc does not look in /usr/bin for ld which results in the following error when building:

collect2: cannot find ld

You can see where gcc looks for other programs with this command:

gcc -print-search-dirs



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