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In Recital 10, you can declare anonymous classes and call anonymous methods in these classes.
// declare some simple procedures 
proc display(cArg)
    echo "display=" + cArg
endproc

proc show(cArg)
    echo "show=" + cArg
endproc

// create an object based on an anonymous class
myobj = new object()

// add some properties
myobj["name"] = "barry"
myobj["company"] = "recital"

// now declare an anonymous method
myobj["mymethod"] = display

// call the method
myobj.mymethod("hello world")    // displays "display=hello world"

// redeclare the method
myobj["mymethod"] = show

// call the method
myobj.mymethod("hello world")    // displays "show=hello world"
Where this becomes particularly useful is when you have a procedure that calls anonymous methods in order to process data. This technique can be used to call anonymous procedures in your code.
proc processdata(oArg)
    oArg.mymethod(oArg.name)    
endproc

proc show(cArg)
    echo "show=" + cArg
endproc

myobj = new object()
myobj["name"] = "barry"
myobj["mymethod"] = show
processdata(myobj)        // displays "show=barry"
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When debugging C code it is common to write debugging to an external text file using the __FILE__ and __LINE__ preprocessor defines to trace execution flow.

Unfortunately java does not support __FILE__ and __LINE__ but you can get the same functionality with this code which can be placed in one of your libraries.
	
public static void showTrace(String msg)
{
	if (msg.length() > 0) System.out.println(msg);
	System.out.println("Trace: " + 
				   "file " + new Throwable().getStackTrace()[1].getFileName() +
				   " class " + new Throwable().getStackTrace()[1].getClassName() +
				   " method " + new Throwable().getStackTrace()[1].getMethodName() +
				   " line " + new Throwable().getStackTrace()[1].getLineNumber());
}
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The SET RELATION Recital Navigational Data Command can be used to link two (or more) tables based on the master index key of the child table.  With a relation active, as you move through the parent table, the record pointer also moves in the child table, automatically selecting the first related record or moving to the end of file if no related record exists.    

open database southwind
// open child table
use order_details order orderid in 0
// open parent table
use orders order orderid in 0
set relation to orderid into order_details
do while not eof()
? orders.orderid, order_details.productid
skip
enddo

The code above will display the productid from the first related record, but you will often want to display information from all the related records in the child or detail table as in an SQL Left Outer Join.

open database southwind
select orders.orderid, order_details.productid;
from orders left outer join order_details;
on orders.orderid = order_details.orderid

In this case, we can use a second nested DO WHILE loop, for example:

open database southwind
use order_details order orderid in 0
use orders order orderid in 0
set relation to orderid into order_details
do while not eof()
// Display first or 0 child record
? orders.orderid, order_details.productid
// Display any additional child records
do while not eof(order_details)
? orders.orderid, order_details.productid
skip in order_details
enddo
skip
enddo

Or we can use the SET SKIP command.  The SET SKIP command can be used with DISPLAY, LIST and REPORT and automatically skips through all the related records in the child table.

open database southwind
use order_details order orderid in 0
use orders order orderid in 0
set relation to orderid into order_details
set skip on
set skip to order_details
list orders.orderid, order_details.productid

LIST and DISPLAY offer a number of keyword options to allow you to configure the display output.  REPORT offers full column based report design.
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This guide will assist you in setting up an rsnapshot backup server on your network. rsnapshot uses rsync via ssh to perform unattended backups of multiple systems in your network. The guide can be found on the centos website here.

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In this article Barry Mavin, CEO and Chief Software Architect for Recital, details Working with Stored Procedures in the Recital Database Server.

Overview

Stored procedures and user-defined functions are collections of SQL statements and optional control-of-flow statements written in the Recital 4GL (compatible with VFP) stored under a name and saved in a Database. Both stored procedures and user-defined functions are just-in-time compiled by the Recital database engine. Using the Database Administrator in Recital Enterprise Studio, you can easily create, view, modify, and test Stored Procedures, Triggers, and user-defined functions

Creating and Editing Stored Procedures

To create a new Stored Procedure,  right-click the Procedures node in the Databases tree of the Project Explorer and choose Create. To modify an existing stored procedure select the Stored Procedure in the Databases Tree in the Project Explorer by double-clicking on it or selecting Modify from the context menu . By convertion we recommend that you name your Stored Procedures beginning with "sp_xxx_", user-defined functions with "f_xxx_", and Triggers with "dt_xxx_", where xxx is the name of the table that they are associated with.

Testing the Procedure

To test run the Stored Procedure, select the Stored Procedure in the Databases Tree in the Project Explorer by double-clicking on it. Once the Database Administrator is displayed, click the Run button to run the procedure.

Getting return values

Example Stored Procedure called "sp_myproc":
parameter arg1, arg2
return arg1 + arg2
Example calling the Stored Procedure from C# .NET:
////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// include the references below
using System.Data;
using Recital.Data;

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// sample code to call a Stored Procedure that adds to numeric values together
public int CallStoredProcedure()
{
	RecitalConnection conn = new 
		RecitalConnection("Data Source=localhost;Database=southwind;uid=?;pwd=?");
	RecitalCommand cmd = new RecitalCommand();
	cmd.Connection = conn;
	cmd.CommandText = "sp_myproc(@arg1, @arg2)";
	cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
	cmd.Parameters["@arg1"].Value = 10;
	cmd.Parameters["@arg2"].Value = 20;
	conn.Open();
	cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
	int result = (int)(cmd.Parameters["retvalue"].Value);    // get the return value from the sp
	conn.Close();
	return result;
	}

Writing Stored Procedures that return a Resultset

If you want to write a Stored Procedure that returns a ResultSet, you use the SETRESULTSET() function of the 4GL. Using the Universal .NET Data Provider, you can then execute the 4GL Stored Procedure and return the ResultSet to the client application for processing. ResultSets that are returned from Stored Procedures are read-only.

Example Stored Procedure called "sp_myproc":
parameter query
select * from customers &query into cursor "mydata"
return setresultset("mydata")
Example calling the Stored Procedure from C# .NET:
////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// include the references below
using System.Data;
using Recital.Data;

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// sample code to call a stored procedure that returns a ResultSet
public void CallStoredProcedure()
{
	RecitalConnection conn = new 
		RecitalConnection("Data Source=localhost;Database=southwind;uid=?;pwd=?");
	RecitalCommand cmd = new RecitalCommand();
	cmd.Connection = conn;
	cmd.CommandText = "sp_myproc(@query)";
	cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
	cmd.Parameters["@query"].Value = "where not deleted()";
	conn.Open();
	RecitalDataReader dreader = cmd.ExecuteReader();
	int sqlcnt = (int)(cmd.Parameters["sqlcnt"].Value);    // returns number of affected rows
	while (dreader.Read())
	{
		// read and process the data
	}
	dreader.Close();
	conn.Close();
}
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If you use Eclipse Ganymede with large projects on linux you may run out of memory. To prevent this happening, you can specify the amount of memory to be allocated to Eclipse in the eclipse.ini file which is located in the eclipse directory.

Specifying this seems to reslove the problem:

-Xmx512m
-XX:MaxPermSize=512m

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Dave Michelle at ITPRO writes a good review of the DS3400 San here.
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Mac OS X leopard supports Universal Binaries so executables and dynamic libraries can be run on multiple architectures. A good example of this is the default apache install on Mac OS X. 
In order to compile apache modules for this architecture you must use the following flags when configuring the apache install.
 ./configure CFLAGS='-arch x86_64' APXSLDFLAGS='-arch x86_64' --with-apxs=/usr/sbin/apxs
Then you must pass the these additional flags to the apxs command in order to generate a Universal Binary shared module.
-Wl,-dynamic -Wl,'-arch ppc' -Wl,'-arch ppc64' -Wl,'-arch i386' -Wl,'-arch x86_64' 
-Wc,-dynamic -Wc,'-arch ppc' -Wc,'-arch ppc64' -Wc,'-arch i386' -Wc,'-arch x86_64' 
If you then do a file command on the shared module it should return; 
$ file mod_recital.so 
mod_recital2.2.so: Mach-O universal binary with 4 architectures 
mod_recital2.2.so (for architecture ppc7400): Mach-O bundle ppc 
mod_recital2.2.so (for architecture ppc64): Mach-O 64-bit bundle ppc64 
mod_recital2.2.so (for architecture i386): Mach-O bundle i386 
mod_recital2.2.so (for architecture x86_64): Mach-O 64-bit bundle x86_64
The apache module files are stored in the /usr/libexec/apache2/ directory on a default apache install on the Mac and the configuration file is /private/etc/apache2/httpd.conf
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There's a nice article on IBM developerworks describing how to package software using RPM. You can read it here.

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Recital 10.0 introduced the COPY DATABASE <name> TO <name> command.. The full syntax is;
COPY DATABASE <name> TO <name>  [ IF [ NOT ] EXISTS ] 
This command is used to copy an existing database to a new database. By default an error will be returned if the target database already exists. Specifying the optional IF NOT EXISTS keywords no error will be returned if the target database already exists. If the optional IF EXISTS keywords are specified and the target database already exists, then it will be removed before the copy. Both the databases must be closed before they can be copied.
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